The PowerHouse Collective: Confidence Takes Vulnerability

Jessy Muller unabashedly lives life on her own terms, bucking the milestones and timelines we’re all “supposed” to be hitting. I have a huge amount of respect for how she moves through the world: she refuses to buy into how society traditionally defines success, the “shoulds” and busyness. Case in point: she bought a 1978 Dodge Commander motor home she is fixing up – with no previous carpentry or automotive skills – and is planning to travel the U.S. on a journey of trust, faith and simplicity.

If you ask me, this requires a huge uterus (notice I didn’t say set of balls – courage doesn’t belong to just the male genitalia) and according to Jessy, a blend of confidence AND vulnerability. Vulnerability is something that has helped her identify insecurities she could confront and work through. In Jessy’s words: “Vulnerability is one of the bravest things – it’s a strength to be vulnerable.

 

I’m curious to know: what is your experience with vulnerability and its connection to confidence? Please leave a comment below.

Here is Jessy’s blog A Girl and Her Commander, documenting her grand endeavor. I eagerly await every post to find out what crazy obstacles she’s overcome, goals she’s accomplished, adventures she’s had and what she’s learning along the way. You can also follow her on Facebook or Instagram – she’s a gifted photographer and artist!

At PowerHouse Performance we offer keynotes, half- and full-day programs in addition to one-on-one coaching to help leaders and employees improve resiliency, performance, confidence and health. Please let us know how we can help your organization.

Fake It ‘Til You Make It

Faker Total faker!

I’ve met people who are divided on this idea. To some it seems an inauthentic way to live, while to others it’s more about behaving in a way you want to become. I happen to fall into the second camp.

If you want to be something, you have to start acting like something.

A friend of mine was doing spoken word in her spare time. When she met other people at poetry slams, they would refer to themselves poets. While she competed and did a lot of writing and speaking, she didn’t feel like she had “earned” the title of being a poet. I also know someone who takes amazing photos in their spare time and is working toward figuring out how to make a living at it, but she refuses to call herself a photographer because she hasn’t had any formal training and doesn’t view herself as an “expert”.

The first person you have to convince about “what” or “who” you are is yourself.

You have to try on a new way of thinking and behaving, and it will feel really weird at first. But the more you keep “faking it” – ie: practicing it – the more natural it will become. You are what you repeatedly do.

After writing my book it gave me the willies to refer to myself as an author. It was like I was putting one someone else’s clothes. Why I wasn’t already referring to myself as an author was a mystery: I’d already been a published contributing author on another book, was writing for Huffington Post and had been blogging for years. But the more I said it, the more I believed it and the more real it became. If you write, that makes you an author.

So when do you actually become what you want to be?

The moment you decide to start faking it.

 

What are you going to start faking today?

 

At PowerHouse Performance we offer keynotes, half- and full-day programs in addition to one-on-one coaching to help leaders and employees improve resiliency, performance, confidence and health. Please let us know how we can help your organization.

The PowerHouse Collective: Confidence Can Be An Ugly Process

It was a privilege to be able to interview Jana Shortal a television reporter who, in addition to being amazing at her job, is challenging commonly held notions about what a female reporter is “supposed to look like”. You may have heard about her earlier this year when a gossip columnist tried to body shame her choice of attire while reporting on one of the biggest stories in Minnesota history. Well, Jana was just listed (as #1 I might add) in Shape Magazine’s 10 Badass Women Who Made 2016 Better By Clapping Back at Body-Shaming Haters.

In this interview Jana shares that confidence is like a sausage – you don’t really want to know what goes into making it, because it’s not pretty. And there’s a big difference between false confidence and authentic belief and comfort with one’s self.

Jana Shortal is a reporter and co-anchor of KARE11’s new 6:30 show Breaking the NewsHailing from small town southern Illinois, she is learning a whole new meaning of “winter” here in the Twin Cities. Jana began reporting for KARE in December of 2003, just in time for the temperatures to fall below her idea of freezing. But, she’s excited about the opportunities to live and learn here in the north. Jana has a Bachelors Degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism. She loves to run, having been in road races for more than 10 years. She’s a writer as well and says she’s working on making her journal into something the masses will read. You can keep up with her on Facebook or Twitter @janashortal

At PowerHouse Performance we offer keynotes, half- and full-day programs in addition to one-on-one coaching to help leaders and employees improve resiliency, performance, confidence and health. Please let us know how we can help your organization.

BROWSE BY CATEGORY

RECEIVE ARTICLES BY EMAIL

Let PowerHouse help you become more resilient. Sign up to receive a free chapter of the book, special content, and alerts to new blog posts. Your address will never be shared, and you can unsubscribe at any time.


Satisfied Clients

ameriprise_logo   aveda-sm   nestle_purina-sm     esteelauder-logo    wells_fargo-sm   jp_morgan_chase-sm